#bodyproudmums

Body Proud MomsBody Proud Moms

We are so delighted to be launching Body Proud Mums, our new campaign that celebrates the beauty of the post-birth body and represents a part of motherhood that is rarely portrayed in the media. As the runner-up in Transport for London’s Women We See competition, Body Proud Mums boldly seeks to normalise their experiences, spark a positive conversation and help mums feel confident and proud of their bodies. At the heart of the campaign is the belief that all mums are beautiful. After all, their bodies have just performed a miracle.

Working with us on the campaign are ten beautiful mums, each with their own incredible story to share.

Behind the campaign imagery is another amazing woman, photographer Sophie Mayanne, who pledged in 2017 to never digitally manipulate skin in her work. Sophie added: “The images depict the raw and incredibly emotional experience of childbirth. The aim is for mums of all shapes and sizes to be able to identify with these photos in one way or another, and to feel more confident with their imperfections.”

Kesia, 17 weeks after giving birth

“I wanted to take part to show people that it is normal to look like this after having a baby. I want to show the baby is more important than the marks!”

“I always knew my body would be different after giving birth, however, I didn’t expect my mind to take so long to get used to seeing myself. I was never “skinny” but I put on more weight than I thought I would.

A lot of friends had babies close to me and they post online about their bodies, and I do feel upset sometimes hat I haven’t bounced back in the same way they have. I know every woman is different and I am not as hard on myself anymore.

I wanted to take part to show people that it is normal to look like this after having a baby. I want to show the baby is more important than the marks!

I see a lot of middle aged women, and I would like to see more women my age. Being a younger Mum isn’t a bad thing! I have loved starting my family at 20.”

Tina, 27 weeks after giving birth

“I also put pressure on myself to try and get my body back, but as I slowly transition into motherhood I am realising that it’s actually not that important, and I just need to be OK in my own skin rather than worrying about what everyone else thinks”

“When I was pregnant, I hated seeing pregnancy and maternity wear all using skinny models with fake bumps. Brands such as Seraphina, ASOS maternity which cater specifically to pregnant women but use fake pregnancy models just make you feel fat. Society tells you to embrace the beautiful new you, but yet the new weight, new baggy clothes all make you feel fat rather than “glowing and pregnant”. So the inspiration behind this project is to show real women, all different shapes and sizes actually not caring about their “big” thighs or “big” bellies – and just trying to be comfortable in their own skin.

It’s rare to see Indian models with curves and big busts. I would like to see more Indian models with lumps and bumps!

At the beginning, being a new mother is so so hard. When you go past the 4 month period they suddenly start recognising you and smile at you when they wake up!

I am not a fan of my new body. Before birth I was muscular and worked out a lot. Now I don’t have time to work out and everything feels saggier! I didn’t expect to feel suddenly so old and droopy! I know it will come back with time and dedication to exercise again, but right now all I want to do is cover up with baggy clothes.

I had terrible morning sickness for the first 5 months of pregnancy. Everyday felt like a bad hangover. Tired, needed sugar, sleepy but can’t sleep. Then suddenly it passed and you feel great and energetic – I even made it to the gym! The last two months you can’t sleep as you are so big and can’t ever get comfortable. The thing that surprised me the most was also the breathlessness. Babies pushing down on your lungs gives you the feeling of having walked up a flight of stairs constantly! Pregnancy generally was just alright. I can’t say that I loved it, or felt bonded to the experience.

Everyday I feel pressure to bounce back. Society, social media, people’s comments all make you feel that way. All over social media it shows these perfect bodies saying they’ve had children and now bounced back so quickly. I, myself remember being really surprised when Kate Middleton came out of the hospital holding Prince George. She had the baby bump, and I remember being surprised that your belly doesn’t just go down after giving birth. I also thought how stupid I was to have ever thought it would. I guess pre children you just have unrealistic expectations. I also put pressure on myself to try and get my body back, but as I slowly transition into motherhood I am realising that it’s actually not that important, and I just need to be OK in my own skin rather than worrying about what everyone else thinks."

Sabra, 10 weeks after giving birth

“At first the changes are scary. Then I realised that the changes are normal. My body doesn’t have to ‘bounce-back’ to my pre-birth body as long as I’m healthy. I realised my stretch marks are a sign of beauty and I learnt to accept myself. I am happy with the changes. And I am happy to share my scars with the rest of the world to show them that they are normal and beautiful. Flaunt that body with a smile and confidence!”

"I felt that this project will help me express and hopefully inspire people about the beautiful changes in a woman’s life and body that occur during and after pregnancy. I hope to show people that this is normal, and it is part of the beauty of being a mother. Now I feel like I am very excited to be part of such a project.

Yes,
I would like to see more of natural beautiyfy and the reality which comes along with acceptance from the world. The media makes it seem that stretch marks and weight gain is not normal but reality is that it is.

Life began. The best part is seeing my baby and husband together with me every morning! (onwards). Seeing her grow and smile. Seeing how she changes.

Coming from a size 4 to a size 8/10 my body feels and looks different. I used to have a flat stomach and now I don’t. My back and down there still feels sore from me to time, my breasts looks bigger and i have stretch mark on my thighs and stomach.
I never expected to feel this way. You never understand the changes your body goes through during and after pregnancy until you embark this journey yourself. At first the changes are scary but I learnt to accept them and love my new body.

Pregnancy is like a rollercoaster ride. There are ups and downs. My journey was with ups and downs. Some days were good while others were bad.
My body went through changes and everyday was different. From morning sickness (which lasted an entire day or two) to stomach cramps and muscle pulls and aches on the legs. Some nights kept me awake while others were great.
Some days I kept healthy while others I had pizza for breakfast and crepe with strawberries, banana and chocolate for lunch. Some days I felt very emotional and cried all day. But you get stronger as the days go by especially when you feel you baby kicking/moving for the first time. I started to feel happier knowing my baby was on her way. I enjoyed shopping for baby clothes, toys, nappies and essentials. I felt excited to prepare for our little one’s arrival.
During this journey, my life changed. It was the most beautiful experience and continues to be as I raise my two-month-old baby girl. And now looking at my beautiful baby girl everyday puts a smile on my face. Her little face makes me appreciate my body and its changes which are normal. I don’t feel ashamed of my stretch marks, hanging belly or the extra fat I’ve gained. They all came with a big bundle of joy.

Having been a small size ALL MY LIFE with a flat belly and slip legs and arms, I did feel under pressure to ‘bounce-back’ to my pre-birth body. Some people laughed at my new body and I felt insecure. I did feel embarrassed and I tried to hide my body. Then I realised that the changes are normal. My body doesn’t have to ‘bounce-back’ to my pre-birth body as long as I’m healthy. I realised my stretch marks are a sign of beauty and i learnt to accept myself. I am happy with the changes. And i am happy to share my scars with the rest of the world to show them that they are normal and beautiful. Women like me should never feel insecure. Flaunt that body with a smile and confidence!

Nardy, 20 weeks after giving birth

“I’m not represented as most Mums in the media are skinny and go back to their pre- pregnancy bodies. But it doesn’t matter – I am at peace with my body and I’m grateful for it. I would like to see more real-life mums with all kinds of bodies – not only the typical young and skinny ones. They need to show an honest look, always.”

“Being a Mum of size is a blessing and knowing how my body has changed in the last 7 years is really amazing in so many different ways. Hard work to grow a tiny human, and then going back to normal full time function deserves a celebration, and gratitude towards my body. So when I heard about the campaign I felt inspired to be a part of it, regardless! I don’t measure up to what society tells me should be the ideal. I feel people need to put less pressure on Mums to go back to their previous bodies before the babies and worry about their overall health mentally, emotionally and physically, to live a fulfilling life in order to give love and care for the new life.

I like the project as it talks about how I feel regarding feeling beautiful today, right now and during all my journey into motherhood. Feeling proud of every mark I’ve obtained. It’s a wonderful price, and my worth has nothing to do with the way my body looks.

I’m not represented as most Mums in the media are skinny and go back to their pre pregnancy bodies. But, it doesn’t matter – I am at peace with my body and I’m grateful for it. I would like to see more real life mums with all kinds of bodies – not only the typical young and skinny ones. They need to show an honest look, always.
The best part of being a Mum of 6 is the love I see everyday. The smiles, the unconditional and honest gestures of love they share with me. The opportunity I get to help the world, making them good people who care about one another and enjoy little moments.

I’m happy with my body, and only have an umbilical hernia that needs to be repaired due to my twin pregnancy, but other than that maybe I need to exercise when I get more time, as I need more energy to look after my six children. I don’t feel different after giving birth – I feel the same, and feel happier even that I gained lots of weight afterwards. It’s rewarding to be able to produce fruits and look after them!!

It’s been a great and interesting journey being able to look after my children. I’ve been lucky enough to not have to work outside of the house – I get to enjoy every moment of teaching them the basic and more to prepare them for real life. Provide them love and sustain them in every little moment. I’ve grown in so many ways and they are shaping my character and teaching me how to enjoy and see beauty in the little things. Time is priceless and nothing is more rewarding than that.

During pregnancy I felt absolutely alright – only a few moments of sickness. I guess I always love being pregnant, and love the way my body changes to grow a baby.

I’ve never felt inclined or pressured by anyone. My self-esteem is stable enough to cope with being bigger than before. There are times where I want to be fitter, maybe to be more energised and I’ve added certain changes to my lifestyle to feel healthier, and that’s helped.”

Harriet, 26 weeks after giving birth

“I am proud of my body, but I have pregnancy weight to lose – but, I’m OK with it taking time. I expected to feel the need to lose it all at once, but I’m OK with it. I have a scar on my stomach from a hernia operation, but I quite like it. I have it because of Teddy.”

“I loved the idea of celebrating postpartum bodies. I have always struggled internally with my weight and how I feel about myself. I put on 4 ½ stone in pregnancy and have lost about 2 ½ so far. How can I hate my body when it has given me my beautiful baby boy? My body has done something amazing, and to me that’s the most empowering thing.

I’m feeling excited, and nervous – but that’s normal. I feel like I’m doing this for all the mum’s who wear baggy tops or cry when they look in the mirror. To say – you are amazing!

I would love to see more realism, more people like me – who try their best. I get my nails done and my eyelashes done, but that’s it really. I love seeing normal people in advertising!

The best thing about being a new Mum is the cuddles, and the smiles in the morning. The joy Teddy brings to my family and the bond Teddy and my husband have is so beautiful to watch. I feel so empowered and proud of myself when I look at Teddy and I can’t wait to teach him to be a gentleman as he grows up, and take him on adventures around the world.

I am proud of my body, but I have pregnancy weight to lose – but, I’m OK with it taking time. I expected to feel the need to lose it all at once, but I’m OK with it. I have a scar on my stomach from a hernia operation, but I quite like it. I have it because of Teddy.
My pregnancy, genuinely – was amazing! I had 5 days of nausea and got very swollen ankles and feet at the end, but my waters broke on their own and I had a “perfect” birth on gas and air with some labouring in the birthing pool. I have been very blessed!

I have had pressure to bounce back – because, when people know other people , usually young ( 20 years and under) who have had children and they have bounced back and they expect that of others. I am a fit individual who always goes to the gym (I love it!) but I still didn’t just “lose it”. I ran until 20 weeks and did gentle exercise until 33 weeks, and swam until 38 weeks – so I didn’t sit on my sofa!

I just say to people it took me 9 months to make him – he’s my priority. It will come off, it just takes time. It’s the people who don’t have children who judge the most. Others mums support each other and tell them they are awesome!!”

Louise, 29 weeks after giving birth

“Giving birth caused me to go into sudden liver failure, due to a rare pregnancy related disease. I had to have an emergency liver transplant and spent the first month of my daughters life in hospital in London away from her... I feel there is a pressure for women to bounce back quickly after birth, especially with social media and celebrities bouncing back within weeks. I certainly felt the pressure to get back to my old self and tried to exercise as soon as possible. I found, however, that this left me frustrated, because I wasn’t able to do the things I used to and realised it would be a longer recovery than I thought.”

“I wanted to do this partly for my own self-confidence, to help with acceptance of my scars and new life. Also to bring some attention to post pregnancy disease and complications.

To an extent I feel like advertising is becoming more relevant. I guess I’m more likely to read women’s magazines, so sometimes I feel those adverts are more high end (affordability less likely!). I think child’s products are represented well in advertisements.

The best thing about being a Mum is watching your babies personality develop, and learning how to read their needs and wants. It took a while to bond with Amelia due to my sickness, so feeling that love develop is amazing.

I’m a little thinner than pre-pregnancy, however, my shape has changed and my stomach is disfigured due to the scar. I feel upset sometimes as the scar reminds me of my surgery, and nearly losing my life. However, it’s also a reminder of how lucky I’ve been and that it’s all been worth it to have Amelia here. When it’s more obvious – ie, when I’m in the gym, I feel more self-conscious.

Once the morning sickness passed about 20 weeks, I was really enjoying pregnancy and showing off my bump. I exercised regularly and looked forward to getting to meet her. I had psoriasis over my body during the 2nd and 3rd trimester, so my tummy was spotty and looked quite funny!

There is definitely pressure to bounce back, but I’m not sure where this has come from. Maybe it’s celebrities/ fitness Instagrams I follow. Even though I had major surgery in June, by October I was keen to get back to the gym, and although it was for fitness, there was an aesthetic component to it. Which is a bit silly. Recently I’ve noticed some celebs are posting “real” post birth bodies like Kate Hudson, and I think this is a really positive thing. Whilst it’s a good thing to exercise and be healthy, it would be helpful from health authorities/ professionals to give women a realistic time frame for post natal bodies to recover, as some aspects can take up to a year.”

Also Included below Louise’s text from her email:

I had my daughter 6 months ago, Amelia. She’s a wonderful, smiley little thing.

My pregnancy caused immediate liver failure after I gave birth and I spent 1 month post birth, following an emergency Liver Transplant, in Kings College Hospital London separated from her.

I Love being a mum more than I imagined I would. It’s not been the start I hoped for- as I could barely even hold her for the first couple of months and had to spend time away in hospital... but ultimately I survived and I’m able to be with her and my husband. I’m accepting a different life than I was expecting. I’m also accepting my scars and the defect on my stomach now.

Sophia, 39 weeks after giving birth

“I wasted a lot of time worrying about how I would look after having children. I was worried about weight gain and stretch marks especially as so many women in the public eye seem to ‘bounce’ back! Since giving birth to my babies I have a newfound respect for my body, even with my extra jiggle and stretch marks.”

“I feel really excited to be taking part in this project. I wasted a lot of time worry about how I would look after having children. I was worried about weight gain and stretch marks especially as so many women in the public eye seem to ‘bounce’ back! Since giving birth to my babies I have a new found respect for my body, even with my extra jiggle and stretch marks. I am proud of what it has archived by bringing Lily and Eloise into the world. I am excited to be part of a project celebrating post-partum bodies because our bodies are all amazing!

I would love to see more divert in advertising. There are a lot of celebrities used which not everyone can relate to.

The best part is walking into their nursery in the morning (even if I have had no sleep) and feeling like a Rockstar. I am always greeted with giant gummy grins, gurgles and excitement. This is when I realise what an honour it is to be a mother.

Before giving birth I was very preoccupied with my figure I worked out a lot and I had very high expectations of myself. Throughout my pregnancy I was shocked at how much changed and it was hard to accept the changes. Since giving birth my body image has changed, and I am proud of my body for holding 2 babies. They were born at full term and no health issues. I don’t mind having tummy wrinkles, it’s a small price to pay for these beautiful little girls.

I had a healthy pregnancy, but it was hard. My belly was full term size at 6 months and it kept growing. I found it really hard to walk and I contently had people stare in shock at my size. I even had strangers make comments on the size of my tummy.

There is a great pressure to bounce back and I also succumbed to the pressure. I’m over it now because I see my body as constantly evolving. To watch my babies grow and achieve their baby milestones inspires me to be healthy and happy and do my best for them – not what social standards tell me I should be. ”

Eleanor, 14 weeks after giving birth

“I’ve seen people on social media bounce back significantly and speedily to their pre-pregnancy weight, so of course I feel the pressure to do so too. I have found it difficult to see my body in the same way, but as the days go by, I am a few steps closer. I didn’t expect my body to change as much as it did, but I would most definitely do it all over again.“

“The inspiration towards me being part of this project is to show those around me that stretch marks and weight gain shouldn’t define you, and to embrace your beauty. I am a young mum, and have many influential people around me who should see how beautiful being a mother is. I have always been the one to love my body no matter what, and my friends look up to me for that.

There is little advertising for plus size women, and curvy women – however being 2019, it is now more acceptable. I would like to see more younger women who have body issues. You don’t really see the teen Mum being advertised, as it is frowned upon.

The best part about being a mother is showing those around me what I am capable of, and making my family and friends proud. Being a young, single mother is most definitely hard, but I am so proud of what I’ve done, and what I will do for my son in the near future. He is my greatest achievement.

Pre-pregnancy I loved my body. I had nice curves and smooth skin. During pregnancy my body changed dramatically, not just in weight – but my breasts and skin. I used to have very small breasts, but now they have changed in an unusual way. I have gained stretch marks for the first time, and not the subtle kind. Over the due course of post-pregnancy I have found it difficult to see my body in the same way, but as the days go by, I am one step closer. I didn’t expect my body to change as much as it did, but I would do it all over again.

I had quite a difficult pregnancy for the most part. I unfortunately had to endure it without the father, and underwent tough situations with him during the pregnancy. I had to leave University, my friends and move back to my Dad’s house. I was pretty lonely, very sick during the first two trimesters, but, into the third trimester things changed. I was happy again, with family and friends – and eager to meet my son. It was definitely not how I imagined pregnancy would be, but I got through it.

I’ve watched a lot of people on social media bounce back significantly fast to their pre-pregnancy weight, so I did feel pressure to do so. As I had a very difficult birth where I lost 1 ½ litres of blood, I was told to wait until my body and strength healed for it to be safe to workout. Taking time will be the best solution for my body. My friends have shown me I’m beautiful either way.”

Chantelle, 11 weeks after giving birth

“I actually love my body. It has done the most amazing thing, and I acknowledge and honour what it has created for me. Any marks left are a welcome reminder of our journey.”

“I liked the idea of being able to do a shoot with my baby. Also, I loved that it was aimed at real women after birth, like a celebration of our amazing bodies.

I feel like I’m represented more now-a-days, but it has taken a while for media to get there. I’d like to see more ‘real’ beauty – the good, the bad and the ugly.

The best part of being a mother is seeing my baby’s happy little face each morning. I love the way he looks at me, like he knows how much I love him and he feels safe with me.

I actually love my body. It has done the most amazing thing, and I acknowledge and honour what it has created for me. Any marks left are a welcome reminder of our journey.

I was very lucky nd has what could be regarded the idea ideal pregnancy. I have fibromyalgia, and the hormones from pregnancy made all my pain go away, which was even more amazing for me.

I’ve not felt any pressure as I have a good, understanding network around me, plus I love being slightly bigger (I used to be very slim and disliked it).”

Tesha, 26 weeks after giving birth

“Now, I’m learning that this is the new me now. My stretch marks are going nowhere and nor is my scar, they are reminders that without them I wouldn't have my son. I can always lose the excess weight, but for now. I'm too busy enjoying my boy.”

“I was inspired as celebrating my post-partum body is something I wanted a positive platform and opportunity to do so. I also would love to capture these precious first months of being a mum in a special way.

As a darker skinned female, I very rarely feel respected in advertising. I would love to see more varied skin tones. As well as ‘normal’ body types without the label ‘plus size’ or ‘curve’.

The best part about being a new mother is knowing that your body grew and gave life to something so special!

I feel ok about my body, but I would be lying if I said I was 100% happy about the way it looks right now but that's more due to fitness than anything else. During pregnancy I adored my changing body I loved my bump but did worry about how it would all change once I gave birth. Once I did give birth, I felt like my old body had died, my confidence was on the floor, I had endured my first operation of my life in order for my child to be born so I was scared, my stomach was lined with angry looking stretch marks and my belly felt and looked like a popped balloon. I was devastated and didn't think I would feel that way at all. It took several months for me to even let my partner see me naked, I can't believe I felt so ashamed. Now, I’m learning that this is the new me now. My stretch marks are going nowhere and nor is my scar, they are reminders that without them I wouldn't have my son. I can always lose the excess weight, but for now. I'm too busy enjoying my boy.

My pregnancy journey was amazing. Minimal medical needs, baby was growing and developing almost by the text book.

Absolutely! it didn't help logging onto my Instagram either and seeing the likes of Kylie Jenner, Cardi B and Khloe Kardashian (to name a few) all flaunting their post baby bodies with not 1 stretch mark insight when my growing bump had already had about 10 scribbled all over! I felt rubbish, so rubbish I stopped following them. I knew it would be unrealistic for me to run into the gym after birth so I tried to focus on eating healthy instead. No woman can honestly say their bodies go completely back to being the same after birth! It could be either physical or emotional or both. But nothing is the same and that's ok! It's a shame not enough influential women are this honest.”


To offer support and advice to new parents, we are working with national charities NCT and PANDAS, as well as offering a wide range of activities and events designed with mums and dads in mind. Look out for our new parent meet-ups with the NCT, expectant parent events, baby sensory classes and other sessions in selected stores across the UK - www.mothercarebookings.com

Body Proud Promise

At Mothercare we always photograph pregnant models for our maternity collections. We never use fake baby bumps. During pregnancy, a woman’s body goes through many changes and our photography reflects the reality of these changes. We also feature models at varying stages of their pregnancy with different bump sizes so customers can see how the clothes will fit their growing baby bump. In addition, we do not digitally enhance or alter the skin on our models

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